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Proud to be part of the 99 percent

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 occupy

Occupy Wall Street is not a fad, it’s not a bunch of hippies holding signs and it’s not to be taken lightly. We are living in a time that history books will remember as a revolution.

Erupting globally and inspiring the oppressed to step up, the fervor of the Occupy Movement is evidence of the deep rooted sentiment of injustice that permeates modern society.

No one guaranteed life would be fair, but everyone should have a chance to succeed. America has become a place where unless you are dealt or born with the cards, you aren’t even going to get a chance to play. The rich get richer.

Presidential hopeful Herman Cain goes as far as to say it’s the protesters own fault that they can’t get a job.

This is further evidence of the complete lack of empathy on the part of the hard right and the hypocrisy in their message. The “party of God” as it so often calls itself, is spitting in the face of Christ-like compassion.

Stephen Colbert, a political comedian, says it best: “If this is going to be a Christian nation that doesn’t help the poor, either we’ve got to pretend that Jesus was just as selfish as we are, or we’ve got to acknowledge that he commanded us to love the poor and serve the needy without condition and then admit that we just don’t want to do it.”

If anyone is not sure what the 99 percent are protesting, visit wearethe99percent.tumblr.com.

Updated every day, the blog chronicles the stories of hundreds of Americans. The Harvard graduate that can’t find a job, the single mother who works 70 hours a week with no health insurance and cannot buy her daughter a violin.

The veteran that can’t afford to go to school, and the six-year old that lost her dad to suicide because he couldn’t feed his family and couldn’t take that shame anymore.

These are real people, and this is the movement that is showing the cracks in the foundation that is this country. Founded on being a land of opportunity, people want the chance at the American dream. As one Tumblr blogger puts it, “we’re living the American nightmare.” All the while, Wall Street looks down from their penthouse windows at the plebeians and calls them lazy, worthless and parasitic.

The bankers reason that they “work harder.” Harder than teachers, truck drivers and janitors. I’m sure.

I’ve watched a hospital release my mother because our health insurance was capped at $5 million and by her third surgery, we had hit that mark.

They sent my mother home because there was no more money. Medicaid luckily came through after three years of trying. There are so many people like my mom.

40 million Americans live on the poverty line or below. Half of all Americans live paycheck to paycheck.

I am honored and humbled to stand alongside of the 99 percent, lucky to live in a  country where the First Amendment gives us the right to occupy and protest and write about this, and I hope like hell that the government and Wall Street start listening to the millions that are starting to raise their voices.

Occupy everything.

Written by Cassie Fambro | Editor-in-Chief

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